Notable Midseason Transfer Tracker

By Kevin Sweeney

As we reach the semester break across the country, we also reach the time for midseason transfers. Whether they be freshmen who quickly realized that their school is not the place for them or upperclassmen leaving the team for various reasons, there is certainly talent to be found midseason that could make a huge impact down the road. I’ll be keeping the list updated with impact guys who’ve announced they’ll transfer and where they wind up throughout the season.

Note: This is not a list of all midseason transfers. This is just a list of the top ones available. 

Curtis Jones, Indiana

A native of Richmond, VA, Jones saw his role diminishing under new head coach Archie Miller and elected to transfer. However, he’s a capable scorer on the wing who can shoot the 3 who’d be an excellent piece for a lot of clubs.

Update 1/1/18: Jones has committed to Oklahoma State, per Jeff Goodman of ESPN.

JaQuori McLaughlin, Oregon State

After a tremendous freshman campaign in which he averaged more than 10 points and 3 assists per game, McLaughlin struggled early on this season and dropped his production to under 3 points per game. A talented lead guard, look for a lot of Mountain West clubs to express interest in McLaughlin.

Jalen Harris, Louisiana Tech

Harris looks like an “up transfer” to me. The 6-5 sophomore wing was in the midst of a tremendous campaign, averaging over 15 points per game while shooting over 44% from downtown, but announced his intention to transfer on December 22. Look for lots high-major programs to be in contention for Harris’ services.

Preston Parks, Citadel

Markelle Fultz. Malik Monk. Dennis Smith Jr. Those were the only 3 freshmen to average more points per game than Parks did last season. The dynamic combo guard averaged 17.5 ppg in The Citadel’s up-tempo system last season, and was improving as a distributor this season while averaging over 13 ppg before announcing he’d be transferring in late November.

Update: Parks has committed to UT-Martin.

DeAndre “Pedro” Bradshaw, Belmont

A playmaking wing, Bradshaw was a 3-star prospect coming out of high school, but never played a game for the Bruins before it was announced he was transferring in early December. Tai Young of Verbal Commits tweeted that Bradshaw would be visiting Missouri State on 12/19 and Washington State 12/21-12/23, so we could be hearing shortly on where Bradshaw’s next destination will be.

Update 12/27: Bradshaw has committed to Eastern Kentucky, per Evan Daniels of 247Sports.

Jordan Tucker, Duke

Tucker leaves Duke after just 1 semester witch the program after seeing very little playing time. A former top-100 recruit who Duke swooped in to land late after missing out on Kevin Knox, Tucker will be a valued commodity on the transfer market. The 6-7 forward can play either the 3 or the 4 and has excellent floor-spacing ability. It wouldn’t surprise me to see Syracuse, who recruited Tucker hard before Duke got involved, makes a push to bring Tucker back to his home state.

Schnider Herard, Mississippi State

A 6-10 Big man who saw his role cut drastically after playing a big role as a freshman, Herard’s intention to transfer was announced on New Year’s Eve. Many saw Herard, a former top-100 recruit, as a breakout candidate this season after averaging 5 points and 5 rebounds in about 18 minutes per game for the Bulldogs last season, but the emergence of freshman Abdul Ado at the Center position has significantly cut Herard’s role on this team long-term. Look for plenty of Sun Belt and Conference USA programs to be interested in this Plano, Texas native.

Asante Gist, Eastern Kentucky

Gist put together a maginificent freshman campaign in 2016-17 at Eastern Kentucky, averaging nearly 16 points and 4 assists per game. But his numbers dropped precipitously this season, and Adam Zagoria reported that Gist has received his release from EKU. He’s the type of undersized combo guard that thrives at the mid-major level.

This list will continue to be updated as the transfer season goes on.

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